Arthur Ransome Trust

Putting Ransome on the Map

Copyright & Trademark

Copyright © 2010-17 Arthur Ransome Trust

(1) Introduction

This website is owned and operated by the Arthur Ransome Trust (ART), charity registered in England and Wales, no 1136565.

In this policy “we” means – and “our” refers to – the Arthur Ransome Trust.

(2) This copyright notice

We created this copyright notice using a template from internet contract experts SEQ Legal, who supply a wide range of legal templates, including consulting contract precedents.

(3) Ownership of copyright

The copyright in this website and the material on this website (including without limitation the text, computer code, artwork, photographs, images, music, audio material, video material and audio-visual material on this website) is owned by us and our licensors.

Text Copyrights

Unless otherwise identified, all quotations are © The Arthur Ransome Literary Estate and are used by permission. They can be found as follows:

“the development of technique, the conquests of new material, (and) the gradual perfecting of form”: A History of Story-telling (1909).

“must explain their apparent inequality in craftsmanship. I tried to correct them, but found in doing so I was imposing one mood on another and blurring both with contradiction. I left them as they were. Craftsmanship is not everything, and those old moods seem to me almost worth regretting, because they are irretrievable.”: The Hoofmarks of the Fawn (1911).

“a sort of open letter to America”: Letter to Edith Ransome (May, 1918)

“A soldier served God and the Great Tzar for twenty-five years, earned three dry biscuits, and set off to walk his way home”: The Soldier and Death (1920)

“The desire to build a house is the tired wish of a man content henceforth with a single anchorage. The desire to build a boat is the desire of youth, unwilling as yet to accept the idea of a final resting place”; “I woke from dreams at night sitting in that paper cockpit, with a paper tiller under my arm, steering a paper ship across uncharted seas. Racundra had to be built. There was no escape”: Racundra’s First Cruise (1923).

“The pleasures of fishing are chiefly to be found in rivers, lakes and tackle-shops and, of the three, the last are least affected by the weather”: Rod and Line (1929).

“I’d have liked to send you a new book by myself. But I haven’t written one and I have begun to feel that I never shall again… So many little jobs to be done makes book writing nearly hopeless”: Letter to Edith Ransome (December, 1928).

“Looking down… in the evening of the day in which they had come to the farmhouse… they had seen the lake like an inland sea. And on the lake they had seen the island. All four of them had been filled at once with the same idea. It was not just an island. It was the island, waiting for them. It was their island. With an island like that within sight, who could be content to live on the mainland and sleep in a bed at night?”; “We can get plenty of rope with five shillings.”; “Whatever it is,” said Captain Flint, “I’ll be glad to come. If we sail to the Baltic, you’ll want someone to haul up the anchor, and if we go prospecting it’ll be hard work on a hill pony if he had to carry the gold as well as the tents”: Swallows and Amazons, (1930).

” ‘That’s much the best way in a story,’ said Titty. ‘Something always goes wrong, and it’s much better for it to go wrong with the people you don’t really like.’ “: Their Own Story, (1930).

“a lovely book about an old school-teacher and a fisherman and a boy and a river”: Letter to Ernestine Evans, (January, 1931).

“Wild Cat Island in sight!”: Swallowdale (1931).

“Dark at tea-time and sleeping indoors. Nothing ever happens in the winter holidays”; “Softly at first, as if it hardly meant it, the snow began to fall,”: Winter Holiday (1934).

“…as usual, though I have five youthful characters and one old lady, I haven’t a glimmering of a plot”: Letter to Edith Ransome, (December, 1933).

“During the last four days I have seen, grabbed, clutched and pinioned a really gorgeous idea for a new book… with a first class climax inevitable and handed out on a plate… lovely new angle of technical approach and everything else I could wish… so I breathe again. I really was afraid I’d done… for these stories by uprooting, but I haven’t. This new idea is the best since Swallows and Amazons ”: Letter to Wren Howard, (January, 1936).

“not very much worse than the worst of the others”: Letter to Edith Ransome, (August, 1936).

” ‘Gold,’ she said. ‘Dick’s a geologist and Nancy’s turned him onto reading all of Captain Flint’s mining books, and tomorrow we’re going right inside Kanchenjunga to talk to Slater Bob…’ “: Pigeon Post (1936).

“If you know a bit of country really well, it takes a very active part in the making of your book. You can count on it… Somehow or other, life flows from it into your story…”: A Letter to the Editor of Junior Bookshelf (1937).

” ‘Giminy,’ said Titty. ‘They aren’t human footprints at all. They’re the hoofmarks of a mastodon.’ “: Secret Water, (1939).

” ‘It’s the Big Five really,’ said Dorothea. ‘They’re the greatest detectives in the world. They sit around in their cubby holes in Scotland Yard solving one mystery after another.’ “: The Big Six, (1940).

” ‘Yes,’ said Miss Lee. ‘At Oxford the scholarship is poor, but the marmalade velly good.’ “: Missee Lee, (1941).

” ‘It’s a Great Northern,’ he said to himself, and had added it to his list before he remembered that Great Northern Divers did not nest in Great Britain.”: Great Northern? (1947).

“I do not like putting my own book in this list, but, unless I do, I should have to omit Aksakov”: Fishing, (1955).

“I had to dip my hand in the water… as a proof to myself that I had indeed come home”; “I was a disappointment to my father in many ways, but shared to the full his passion for the hills and lakes of Furness”; “In 1903, while I was employed to do nothing by the Unicorn Press, I began to earn small sums for stories and articles from the daily and weekly newspapers”; “We went down to their boathouse and out in the Swallow… the first of a long dynasty of Swallows in my sailing life”; “During all that time the leaves of the trees seemed more luminous than they are today and the hills had sharper edges”; “I bought some packing cases by way of temporary furniture, had a brief skirmish with my landlord who distrusted a lodger with only books as distrainable chattels, sat exultantly at the open window, fell asleep and woke with a cold in my head.”; “experienced journalist with a thorough knowledge of athletics”; “Twenty and thirty years later I have been amused to see on bookstalls, still bought by would-be athletes, some of the books of practical instruction… masquerading under once-famous names, that I produced during my six weeks of ghostly and breathless activity”; “I opened it with shaking hands, to find half a dozen copies of my first book, bound in pale mottled paper boards, with a brown cloth spine and a label with the title on it”; “The only excuse for those early books is that they were written (and unfortunately published) at a time when I should have been a university student and saved from myself by the laughter of my fellows. Instead I was keeping myself alive by selling what should have been mere exercises. It surprises me that I was able to sell them. I wanted to write essays or stories, but it never occured to me to write such essays or such stories as were published in the popular magazines.”; “Who never wavered in their belief that all this endless scribbling would some day be justified”; “It is a daring thing to write at all and confidence is something easily lost. I know now how careful Mr Collingwood was lest he should shake mine…”; “A prose allegory of mental processes which I meant to be enjoyed by children who should not notice there was an allegory at all.”; It has been enjoyed by a few elderly persons who have not noticed even that it was a story.”; “a hard blow indeed”; “not bad for a little town boy”; “one of five little volumes”; “we were paid ten pounds apiece for them, which seemed like a lot of money for very little work”; “a good idea wasted”; “There’s a book that ought to be written, and you are the one who ought to write it…”; “essayistical sort of book”; “a stout grey volume, looking like a real book, of which I was extremely proud”; “I was again worrying over the technique of narrative, which I found at once so interesting and so difficult”; “bad habit of sending books to the printer piecemeal”; “rediscovered the pleasure I had known as a small boy watching a perch-float”; “My book on Edgar Allen Poe was given much better reviews than it deserved”; “It is only fair to say that I do not think that Secker, when he commissioned the book, had any idea that he was inviting me to put my foot into a hornet’s nest”; “thirteen months of wretchedness”; “at all costs to write no more books that could by any conceivable mischance involve me again in such misfortune”; “remarkable man… whose escapades influenced the fortunes of many beside myself”; “Suddenly, unexpectedly, a new blow fell”; “Just as I had put every egg into one basket, the bottom of that basket had fallen out”; “in danger of losing every asset I had”; “I spent the morning… working out a synopsis of twenty chapters, took a sledge, drove into Moscow and bought a lot of typewriting paper”; “if only to prove to myself that I could”; “I made up my mind to learn enough Russian to be able to read Russian folklore in the original and to tell those stories in the simple language that they seened to need”; “friends with some and enemies of a very few”; “to counteract the misinformation which seemed to me to have launched us on a course that must end in disaster”; “The little book makes no claim to knowledge of politics or economics, but it does give a fair picture of what Moscow was like in those days of starvation, high hope and unwanted war”; “collected material for a small book on the economic crisis and the means being taken for dealing with it”; “more than anything else, this boat helped me to get back to my proper trade of writing”; “I saw Lloyd George who suggested I make a book of my Chinese articles”; “always looked upon (that) book as the first sign of escape from the political writing in which I had been engulfed for so long”; “Before I got home I had the whole beginning of the book clear in my head”; “The whole book was clear in my head. I only had to write it”; “1929 was for me the year of crisis… a hinge year, as it were, joining and dividing two quite different lives”; “With some diffidence I told him about Swallows and Amazons and showed him my half-sheet of paper. ‘That’s all right’ said Napolean Cape. ‘We’ll publish it and pay one hundred pounds on account of royalties. But it’s the essays we want.’ “; “Our savings were melting away, but… we thought we could take the risk of one more year and the writing of Peter Duck”; “The writing of an autobiography at sixty-five, seventy-three, seventy-eight, knowing that there is no time in which to put right the mistakes of the past, is like a reheasal for the Day of Judgement, and not an early rehearal either but perhaps the very last”; “I seem to have lived not one life but snatches from a dozen different lives”; “Mine has not been a life of consistent effort towards a single end”: The Autobiography of Arthur Ransome (1976).

“No matter where I was, wandering about the world, I used at night to look for the North Star and, in my mind’s eye, could see the beloved sky-line of great hills beneath it”: Author’s Note to Swallows and Amazons (1958).

“A good book is not merely a thing that keeps a child (or a grown-up person) amused while reading. It is an experience he shares, something that he himself lives.”: Letter to a Mr Marriott (undated).

Image Copyrights and Permissions

The images used on the home page and elsewhere on this website are acknowledged as follows:

“I had to dip my hands in the water…”: Colour Image of Monk Coniston Jetty, image ref 09121204monk_coniston, © Tony Richards; black and white image of Arthur Ransome in Russian Press Corps uniform holding pipe, image ref 418303, reproduced with the permission of the Brotherton Collection, Leeds University Library.

“Wild Cat Island in Sight!”: Colour image of Peel Island, Coniston, image ref 08110113brown_howe, © Tony Richards; black and white image of Arthur Ransome steering Racundra, image ref 418324, reproduced with the permission of the Brotherton Collection, Leeds University Library.

“Mine has not been a life of consistent effort…” Colour image of lake and the Old Man of Coniston, image ref 07082902monk_coniston, © Tony Richards; black and white image of Arthur Ransome in fur coat and hat, image ref 418310, reproduced with the permission of the Brotherton Collection, Leeds University Library.

“Softly at first, as if it hardly meant it…” Colour image of snow in Coniston Village, image ref 09122004coniston, © Tony Richards; black and white image of Arthur Ransome reading, image ref 418332, (c) The Arthur Ransome Literary Estate, used by permission and reproduced with the permission of the Brotherton Collection, Leeds University Library.

“We went down to the boathouse and out in the Swallow…” Colour image of trees reflected in Coniston Water image ref 091221204monk_coniston, © Tony Richards; black and white image of Arthur Ransome smoking pipe, image ref AR1, reproduced with the permission of the Brotherton Collection, Leeds University Library.

“The whole book was clear in my head…” Colour image of sunset over Coniston Water, image ref 07122118monk_coniston, © Tony Richards; black and white image of Arthur Ransome wearing tweed hat, image ref 418313, (c) The Arthur Ransome Literary Estate, used by permission and  reproduced with the permission of the Brotherton Collection, Leeds University Library.

Images © Tony Richards are reproduced from Lakeland Cam.

The black and white images used on the homepage and elsewhere on this site can be found in the Ransome archives in the Brotherton Collection. You can find out more about the Brotherton Collection at Specials Collections, Leeds University Library.

The line drawings used on this site are © Arthur Ransome Literary Estate; they are used by kind permission of Arthur Ransome’s Literary Executors. The Arthur Ransome Trust Logo is © Arthur Ransome Trust.

Template Copyrights

This Copyright and Trademark Notice and our Privacy Policy, Terms and Conditions and Linking Policy, are based on templates provided by SEQ Legal LLP.

(4) Use of Trademark

“Swallows & Amazons®” is a registered trademark of the Arthur Ransome Literary Estate (No 2219604) and is used on this website by permission of the Arthur Ransome Literary Estate.

(5) Copyright licence

We grant to you a worldwide non-exclusive royalty-free revocable licence to:

  1. view this website and the material on this website on a computer or mobile device via a web browser;
  2. copy and store this website and the material on this website in your web browser cache memory; and
  3. print pages from this website for your own personal and non-commercial use.

We do not grant you any other rights in relation to this website or the material on this website. In other words, all other rights are reserved.

For the avoidance of doubt, you must not adapt, edit, change, transform, publish, republish, distribute, redistribute, broadcast, rebroadcast or show or play in public this website or the material on this website (in any form or media) without our prior written permission.

(6) Data mining

We take the protection of our copyright very seriously.

If we discover that you have used our copyright materials in contravention of the licence above, we may bring legal proceedings against you seeking monetary damages and an injunction to stop you using those materials. You could also be ordered to pay legal costs.

If you become aware of any use of our copyright materials that contravenes or may contravene the licence above, please report this by writing to our email or postal addresses below.

(7) Permissions

You may request permission to use our copyright materials on this website by writing to our email or postal addresses below.

(8) Enforcement of copyright

We take the protection of our copyright very seriously.

If we discover that you have used our copyright materials in contravention of the licence above, we may bring legal proceedings against you seeking monetary damages and an injunction to stop you using those materials. You could also be ordered to pay legal costs.

If you become aware of any use of our copyright materials that contravenes or may contravene the licence above, please report this by writing to our email or postal addresses below.

(9) Infringing material

If you become aware of any material on our website that you believe infringes your or any other person’s copyright, please report this by writing to our email or postal addresses below.

(10) Contact Us

Should you have any questions about this copyright policy, please write to us by post or email, using our contact details.

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